Anyone have a mega moto 212?

#42
I once read an official Lifan document that stated not replacing the shipping oil with proper engine oil (motor oil, if you prefer that term) before starting the engine would void the warranty (I'm not going to search for it because info on Chinese products is very difficult to find). The reason being that the engines are shipped with shipping oil that is for the purpose of preventing rust during shipping and storage but not suitable for lubrication. Maybe MM performs an oil change, maybe not. I would change the oil in any Chinese engine before starting it.
 
#44
I once read an official Lifan document that stated not replacing the shipping oil with proper engine oil (motor oil, if you prefer that term) before starting the engine would void the warranty (I'm not going to search for it because info on Chinese products is very difficult to find). The reason being that the engines are shipped with shipping oil that is for the purpose of preventing rust during shipping and storage but not suitable for lubrication. Maybe MM performs an oil change, maybe not. I would change the oil in any Chinese engine before starting it.
I use the factory oil for a short break-in (2hrs,or less) then replace it with some good NON synthetic oil for a good break in period. After the rings seat,I go to synthetic oil (Mobile One).
 
#45
Ya great. I think mobile 1 synthetic is the best that's what I run. At $7 a quart it's got to be better. Do you know a better brand or I will just stick with Mobil 1. I just want the best oil because clean and good quality oil is the life of an air cooled engine.
 
#46
I went out this morning to really check things over! What I found was I had both bolts missing on the top VCT covers I replaced them. Then I noticed the smell of gasoline? Checking,I found it was leaking gasoline on the shop floor. I removed the air cleaner ,then the air box and found the leak. It was in the fuel line where it attaches to the carburetor! They had been the little strap tab down pointing to the inside. Perfectly slicing the fuel line when it was tightened down! So Now I'm replacing the fuel line! I had a feeling that this wasn't going to be easy! LOL!
 
#47
Ya great. I think mobile 1 synthetic is the best that's what I run. At $7 a quart it's got to be better. Do you know a better brand or I will just stick with Mobil 1. I just want the best oil because clean and good quality oil is the life of an air cooled engine.
Mobile One is about as good a oil as you can get! There are other brands that are formulated for cycle engines, like Bel Ray,but I don't think they are any better?
 
#50
Hope my mini isn't as labor intensive as yours
If it is, it's not hard to fix! Just takes a little extra time to get things lined out! Their biggest down fall is they use the cheapest parts they can find! My fuel line turned out to be soft Vaccum Line,I went to NAPA and got some real fuel line, and replaced it, it's all good now! IMG_3163.JPG
 
#52
I went out this morning to really check things over! What I found was I had both bolts missing on the top VCT covers I replaced them. Then I noticed the smell of gasoline? Checking,I found it was leaking gasoline on the shop floor. I removed the air cleaner ,then the air box and found the leak. It was in the fuel line where it attaches to the carburetor! They had been the little strap tab down pointing to the inside. Perfectly slicing the fuel line when it was tightened down! So Now I'm replacing the fuel line! I had a feeling that this wasn't going to be easy! LOL!
https://www.oldminibikes.com/forum/...er-moto-212-torque-converter-exploded.161885/
 
#55
Who ever designed the Monster Moto 212 Frame got it right!:scooter: The rake is right and the trail is also! It gives you the feeling of riding a bigger bike ,by the way it rides and handles! There is no need to chop off the rear frame or modify the frame for rear suspension. It rides fine as is,infact if you didn't know better you would think it has rear suspension, by the feel it gives while riding it. Sometimes "simple" is better! Tuning the "rear" suspension on a MM 212 is a simple as letting some air out of the rear tire, until you get the ride you like. I inflate mine to the manual recommended max of 10psi,and it rides smooth, if I get into areas where the ride turns really rough, it's as simple as letting a couple of pounds of air out of the tire!;) Carry a tire gauge, and a small bicycle hand pump, and your ready for anything you run into! Just try diffrent air pressures in the rear tire until you find one that you like best, then remember it, or write it down and your good to go!
 
#57
Got mine really nice brakes work well and lots of power.
Check out my other thread it has pics and a lot more. It's this "mini bike for under $600. Suggestions?" Check it out all my stuff is over there.
 
#59
I'm the guy who designed the 212. Getting the handling right was my first priority. Compare the Coleman CT200U and the 212 and you'll see how bad the CT handles. The original 212 design, (Originally the MM-B212 now the 212 PRO) uses 34mm tubing for the main frame, (mostly a design choice than a strength or durability choice), and has a headlight, CVT, front suspension, and front and rear hydraulic disc brakes. The rigid rear was used to keep costs and complexity down. The large tires with 10psi help to absorb the bumps. The second version was done for Walmart. It uses 25mm tubing, rigid front fork, rear hydraulic disc brake, and a centrifugal clutch with an automatic chain tensioner. The third version, (Mega Max 212) was done for other mass retailers and was similar to the Walmart version but has front suspension. As for the 212cc Lifan engine, Lifan rates them at 7.5hp. Their earlier 212cc engines were rated at 7.0hp but Lifan came up with a new head design and a rating of 7.5hp. We used the 7.5hp engines in all of the 212's.
Getting back to the frame design, I made it so the tooling for the rigid rear design could be simply modified for a rear suspension model to be produced later possibly for non mass-retailer businesses. However, don't hold your breath for a rear suspension model.
 
#60
FYI: My original gearing for the 212 put the top speed at 58mph, 48T rear sprocket and no speed limiter in the CVT. The 212 pulled that speed easily on the street, but suffered some in hill climbing duties. So for production we went with a 53T rear for torque combined with a speed limiter to bring the top speed to about 33mph for licensing regulations in some states.
 

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