General Lee minibike.

Mini Bike & Go-Kart Parts

Li'l Popeye

Well-Known Member
#81
If you want less vibrations try a salsbury 330 or comet 340 (same clutch) hard to get but from what I've herd the driver is balanced nearly perfectly and has little to no vibration and its set up for more power and rpms than a comet 30. I think GTC sells a copy but its nearly 400$
Who would have thought...
The following may sound like I'm sponsored, but I'm not! In fact I've paid in total (Juggernaut+Tshirt+shipping to Netherlands+handling+import tax+FedEx handlingcosts) around $200,-. I'm willing to except sponsorship, though...

It's called Juggernaut. I installed it today.


It is a direct replacement for the stock driver. I could use the same spacer and it lined up perfect with the driven.
I could also use the same bolt that threads into the crank.
It is just 1,2% heavier as the Chinese driver (with zinc weights):
Juggernaut: 1686 grams
Chinese driver: 1662 grams

So what about vibrations?!
A lot less as to the Chinese driver and I think vibrations that still are there are "normal" and caused by engine.
The Chinese driver created vibration as soon as it started to engage, that's history with this new driver.
Happy with that.

Performance:
FYI: I've installed it on "stock" GX 160, governor removed, Chinese Mikuni, billet rod, alu flywheel, stock valves, stock cam, 18lbs springs, slightly higher compression. 15T sprocket on driven and 85T sprocket at my rear tire.
The engine is allowed to make more rpm's and it does. I've measured it around 6500 rpm. The driver does not "close" as much as the stock driver does. With the stock driver it goes into overdrive and the new driver (Juggernaut) does not go into overdrive (I think). The belt doesn't climb as high as it does with the stock driver. So rpm's are there, but if it is faster, I could not tell.
I have no speedometer to measure.
It "sounds" faster, because of the higher rpm's. Did it feel faster? No, or not much if it is. It will be faster if my engine makes more rpm's.
Overall I'm happy with the purchase. Designwise it is another level as the stock driver is.

PS: noticed the "dirt" on my fender and gastank? It is clearcoat/laquer that can't resist gas... It turns "sticky" and collects all kind of dust and dirt. Another lesson learnt and a new paintjob is requirred.
 

cfh

Well-Known Member
#82
I have an Ap on my phone that measures speed using GPS. you should download that. it works really well and gives you speed data without installing any equipment.
 

Li'l Popeye

Well-Known Member
#83
I have an Ap on my phone that measures speed using GPS. you should download that. it works really well and gives you speed data without installing any equipment.
I've had such an app, but it drained the battery and my battery by clicking-away-ads.
 

Li'l Popeye

Well-Known Member
#85
when you say your running a aluminum flywheel. what one are you running?
The ultra light on 1 minibike and a gxv 160 aluminium flywheel (I don't recall the partnumber) on the other minibike. I've had this Juggernaut mounted on both minibikes seperatly and I'm pleased with the decrease of vibrations.
Note: I was running stock zink weights in the drivers and with the aluminium weights the vibrations might be a lot less, too. But overall, to me, the design of this new driver looks better.
 

cfh

Well-Known Member
#86
i run an Ap on the iphone called 'speedometer' and it has *no* ads. also i turn it off after i'm done using it so it's not running in the background.
 
#87
The ultra light on 1 minibike and a gxv 160 aluminium flywheel (I don't recall the partnumber) on the other minibike. I've had this Juggernaut mounted on both minibikes seperatly and I'm pleased with the decrease of vibrations.
Note: I was running stock zink weights in the drivers and with the aluminium weights the vibrations might be a lot less, too. But overall, to me, the design of this new driver looks better.
I wonder if it would have less vibrations with the ARC flywheel with standard cooling fins. maybe little more heavier? i think couple things are not helping in that design. one the inner pulley is stamp steel. that may not be spinning 100 percent true and they definitely shouldn't use those large nuts and bolts to hold the roller weights together. the original jr 340 use a billet machine out aluminum pulley and use light weight rivets to hold the rollers on the bracket. just can't have all that extra dead weight spinning at any rpm's. my opinion the aluminum flywheels just cant take it. it might go away with a third bearing support. but who wants that on a minibike. i still plain on getting one and doing a small review on it also. for my application it will have a cast iron flywheel and the engine will only spin 6-7000 rpm's max. see how it go's
 

Li'l Popeye

Well-Known Member
#88
cvt unit is a interesting piece. I also see they come in different sizes depending what kind of scooter you have. if a guy could find one that use the same width belt as a 20 series so the travel spacing is correct and pulley size. if not i'm sure the travel spacing could be modified and then you would want to fab the centers of the cvt unit to fit over the 3/4 crank. that's if there is material to machine or weld too and you want to reverse the mount or I should say flip around so the weights are on the outside and the fix pully is on the inside. then it could work with a rear driven 20 series 6inch or 7inch unit. nice thing if it did work it would balance out 10x times better then a steel comet unit that is stock or even been modified. also looks like it would not take up a lot of spacing. I see they make some aftermarket parts too ,Teflon coated unit,different rollers...etc...
I have looked at these variators and I noticed they don't have any springs in them. Would it be needed to have springs in them to return?
Also I don't know at what rpm's they work as most scooters here are 2 stroke. Heavier rollers might solve it.
 
#89
I have looked at these variators and I noticed they don't have any springs in them. Would it be needed to have springs in them to return?
Also I don't know at what rpm's they work as most scooters here are 2 stroke. Heavier rollers might solve it.
haven't look at them lately. I believe they where controlled by different type of rollers you installed. some of them guys drag race with them in other countys.....malaysia..? ..etc.. and they look to be putting out good amount of power. could a guy fab one up to a 3/4 keyway crank? it's been awhile the last time i look into them and i believe they mount to a spline shaft? so if a guy had a lathe/mill i think you could fab something up easy. they also look like they would balance better on a crankshaft too. especially the racing units they make. all the parts look to be machine out parts(billet aluminum) and light too. still alot of if's to look into.
 

Li'l Popeye

Well-Known Member
#90
A lot of if's indeed.
Some are cheap enough to try something out.
You are right about the balancing part.
I have no clue what size they are. I think they are smaller as a stock driver.
 
#91
I had to do little research to find this again. this looks to be the setup maybe to try out. the big thing is fabing the front unit to a 3/4 crank. the back would be a lot easier. just rob the shaft out of a transfer case and machine it for a 5/8 or 3/4 keyway mounted on a jackshaft plates. if indeed that would work?
this disc setup looks to be very good. notes how hard the bike accelerates when he gives it gas. almost like a direct drive. still a lot for me to learn how this unit works and if it would be a ideal setup for drag racing(my application). one thing I do really like is that front pulley unit. really looks light. I don't think the engine would even notes it on it spinning at any rpm you give it.
here is the video.....interesting to look at.
 

Li'l Popeye

Well-Known Member
#92
I had to do little research to find this again. this looks to be the setup maybe to try out. the big thing is fabing the front unit to a 3/4 crank. the back would be a lot easier. just rob the shaft out of a transfer case and machine it for a 5/8 or 3/4 keyway mounted on a jackshaft plates. if indeed that would work?
this disc setup looks to be very good. notes how hard the bike accelerates when he gives it gas. almost like a direct drive. still a lot for me to learn how this unit works and if it would be a ideal setup for drag racing(my application). one thing I do really like is that front pulley unit. really looks light. I don't think the engine would even notes it on it spinning at any rpm you give it.
here is the video.....interesting to look at.
I've searched this renevo clutch and saw it's price.... that's not even funny anymore.
These setups need to run a clutch? I assumed it would be the same principal as a the tc I use. Looks like the belt is always turning even on idle. That's why they don't have springs in the variator, I guess.
I just ordered a cheap variator like these, just to see how it works and could be modified to work with my tc.
 
#93
I would think just for testing purposes a cheaper drum clutch would still work. I think the only draw back would be it's little heavier and doesn't run as smooth disc unit. but would a guy even feel that on a minibike? drum unit would be mounted buy it's self. like I said earlier I have not look into them that much,but if indeed the belt is always spinning and is more engage then a torque converter? to me it would act more direct drive or I should say more consistent being it's in engage all the time. not like a torque converter that will go into a neutral state(belt loose) other question would be how small of a belt you could get for it. belt now is just to long for a minibike. like to see how that bike in that video would run with a much lower gear. you can tell it's got some real tall gears in it. thing must go 60 mph.... also notes how at the end of the video change out the stall rpm's and him getting on it real hard in the parking lot.
just think if that was just a minibike he had to push with much lower gears.....:scooter:
 

Li'l Popeye

Well-Known Member
#94
Since the isolation in the muffler was all blown out, I decided to fill the muffler with stainless curls from the lathe. That won't blow out, like the glass wool did.


I cut the muffler open.


This is the new isolation that will be put in.


Stuffed as good as it gets.


Welded a new endplate to the muffler and it is ready to go.

It's still loud, but it is less loud. It is okay like this. I do need to make an extra support to the exhaust, otherwise it will crack near the flange, because of weight and vibrations.
 

Li'l Popeye

Well-Known Member
#96

I got this picture of the new owner of my former General Lee minibike. He has mounted a Robin engine on it.


At the moment I'm building a new General Lee minibike and it is nearly completed. This time I will paint it with fuel proof paint.


I might put this fuel level sensor in the new gas tank of General Lee. The dimensions seem to be ok. I have tested it and it works perfect with the universal speedo/tachometer.

>>>Video of universal speedo/tachometer<<<
 

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