Removing governor on your engine and omb !!! Please read !!!

I do agree that modifying engines can be risky, but I can say, from personal experience, the stock valves do float before the rods break. But no one leaves the stock valves in, which is why these peoples engines are failing.
 
I do agree that modifying engines can be risky, but I can say, from personal experience, the stock valves do float before the rods break. But no one leaves the stock valves in, which is why these peoples engines are failing.
Valve float has nothing to do with the actual valves. It's the valve springs that are the issue. You need heavier ones to prevent it.
 
I personally don't know why the first thing on everybody's to-do list is to rip out the governor. In stock form most of these engines aren't balanced well enough to handle the higher RPM's, the heads don't flow well enough and the valve-train can't handle it. What people don't understand is once you start altering one aspect, the next weakest point is where it will fail. If you want a little more performance, up the compression by using a thinner head gasket or mill it some, clean up the ports/valve bowls, install a little stronger valve springs, a lighter flywheel, hotter coil, a 22mm Chikuni, a cheap tach/hour meter and adjust the governor around 5,000 RPM by moving the spring out on the governor arm. The result will be a snappier throttle, less valve float and better reliability without breaking the bank. This is my personal opinion, you can do what you want, either way, don't blame me if you blow up your engine.
 
For me, any engine without a governor I'm doing a rod and flywheel. It's just my personal preference. I know they're not necessary when running an otherwise mildly modded setup. I like the Chikuni carbs and you can't run a governor with them.
Yup, realized that about the Chikuni after I posted, silly me.
 
Valve float has nothing to do with the actual valves. It's the valve springs that are the issue. You need heavier ones to prevent it.
And that's why peoples engines are blowing up. They're focused on preventing valve float and they forget that the valves floating keeps the engines from revving to the point where they throw a rod or grenade a flywheel. Though with valve float as a limiter, there is a risk of the engine dropping a valve. In other words, if you're upgrading the valve springs, you must upgrade the rod and flywheel.
 
I personally don't know why the first thing on everybody's to-do list is to rip out the governor. In stock form most of these engines aren't balanced well enough to handle the higher RPM's, the heads don't flow well enough and the valve-train can't handle it. What people don't understand is once you start altering one aspect, the next weakest point is where it will fail. If you want a little more performance, up the compression by using a thinner head gasket or mill it some, clean up the ports/valve bowls, install a little stronger valve springs, a lighter flywheel, hotter coil, a 22mm Chikuni, a cheap tach/hour meter and adjust the governor around 5,000 RPM by moving the spring out on the governor arm. The result will be a snappier throttle, less valve float and better reliability without breaking the bank. This is my personal opinion, you can do what you want, either way, don't blame me if you blow up your engine.
Perfect truth article. .
We totally ruined a Coleman 212 CT2000 or whatever there called..over a Saturday with governor spring clipped...stock engine but spun too fast for what it was made for.....
Its now a vibration monster all over handlebars now shake back and forth.engine vibration horrible now.
Wish I left it alone... It operated fine with governor. ...
On the Tote Gotes some models operate and ride the cliffs better with governor installed...
 
I personally don't know why the first thing on everybody's to-do list is to rip out the governor. In stock form most of these engines aren't balanced well enough to handle the higher RPM's, the heads don't flow well enough and the valve-train can't handle it. This is my personal opinion, you can do what you want, either way, don't blame me if you blow up your engine.
I think you meant to post this on the briggs flathead section ....................................
 

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