Lighting Coil and High RPM Question

#1
Hello,

I recently upgraded the performance of one of my Hs50s and it now revs up more, and quicker.
My lighting coil is on my stock engine, but I am liking the cammed engine more lol

If I put the lighting coil on the hi po engine, I was wondering if there would be any adverse effects, either to the coil, magnets?
Or will the increased revs wear out the light bulbs sooner?

Thanks for any advice.
 
#2
It will not hurt the coil or the magnets. The faster you rev the engine, the higher the voltage will go. It will burn out the headlights faster and or damage anything else you connect to the system. A voltage regulator will fix the overvoltage issue.
 

Rapidrob

Well-Known Member
#3
No
No and yes. The higher RPM W I L L produce more Voltage. This voltage will go much beyond what the lamps can take over time and blow the filament.
You can install a motorcycle voltage regulator/rectifier to change the AC to DC and limit the output voltage.
Many of these devices require a battery in order to work. There must be a battery voltage feedback for the regulator to turn on.
Or you can add a device like this, that requires no battery in order to work.
http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5335845805&icep_item=263780004555
By installing this device or one like it, the bulbs will last for years after you adjust the device to no more than 14 VDC under load. ( lights on)
 
#4
It will not hurt the coil or the magnets. The faster you rev the engine, the higher the voltage will go. It will burn out the headlights faster and or damage anything else you connect to the system. A voltage regulator will fix the overvoltage issue.
Thanks very much for the heads up! I’ll look up voltage regulators and see what I can find.
 
#5
No
No and yes. The higher RPM W I L L produce more Voltage. This voltage will go much beyond what the lamps can take over time and blow the filament.
You can install a motorcycle voltage regulator/rectifier to change the AC to DC and limit the output voltage.
Many of these devices require a battery in order to work. There must be a battery voltage feedback for the regulator to turn on.
Or you can add a device like this, that requires no battery in order to work.
http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5335845805&icep_item=263780004555
By installing this device or one like it, the bulbs will last for years after you adjust the device to no more than 14 VDC under load. ( lights on)

Thank you for the link Rapidrob!

So it looks like I would need the 5v-22v AC input, and then the DC output is adjustable and I should set it for 12v?

It’s cheap enough to try out at any rate, I’ll get one and try it out. My lighting coil doesn’t really make enough power to charge a battery unfortunately.
 

Rapidrob

Well-Known Member
#6
What is the output with no load?
If you have two coils, the stater can produce 50 Watts. More than enough to charge a battery. Even the El cheapo coils of 30 Watts would charge a battery.
The device does have an input of 5-22 VAC. If your bike at high RPM produces high 20's or even more, there are devices listed to take 5- 45 volts input.
 
#7
To be honest I haven’t taken any no load readings yet. I think it’s only like 3v AC at idle but will increase with RPM to around 12v AC at 3600 if I remember right.
 
#10
Thank you for the link Rapidrob!

So it looks like I would need the 5v-22v AC input, and then the DC output is adjustable and I should set it for 12v?

It’s cheap enough to try out at any rate, I’ll get one and try it out. My lighting coil doesn’t really make enough power to charge a battery unfortunately.
Depending how high you are set up to rev the engine you will likely go over the 22 volt input. I agree with the statement by Rapidrob that the higher input regulator is better. Also, yes, add a small 12 volt battery. AGM alarm batteries work well and can be pretty small. Any input will charge, just slowly. You are not running a starter so you do not need much battery output. Set the voltage regulator to 14.6 volts max output.
 

Rapidrob

Well-Known Member
#11
A small battery pack using Li/ion batteries works very well. Read what the fully charged batteries are at rest, then set the R/R device to one volt lower than the batteries. You will never over charge the batteries and they will last a very long time.
I use a battery pack from ebay that holds four 18650 batteries.
http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5335845805&icep_item=232922494548
I use old laptop batteries I get for free.
By using the four battery holder it is easy to adjust the R/R to under the max voltage but still slightly above 13.5 volts for max brightness and life of the batteries.
By using only LED lamps/bulbs the small battery pack will run the LED's for hours with the engine off.
If the battery goes dead ( light switch left on) you can charge the battery pack by using a small 12 VDC charger and alligator test leads to the battery or terminal strip.
And, if you want to go the route I did, I also added a cell phone charger to the battery pack!
There's nothing like being in the middle of nowhere, the cell phone has been on roam for hours and the battery is at 2%. Of course this is the time you really need to make a phone call for what ever reason, like you find a hurt hiker/biker whose phone is also dead due to roaming.
I've built several of these devices for my wife and friends who really appreciate having them when needed.
http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5335845805&icep_item=223525905526
When not is use by your phone, they use little power. I put mine on a glued to the battery miniature switch.
 
#12
Thanks for the help I appreciate it
Engine will not be revving to the moon, just higher than stock. Lighting coil is expensive so don’t want to damage it, or end up going through headlight bulbs all the time.
I like the idea of battery power, just have to find a place to mount the battery.
 

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