Timing key for PVL flywheel?

#1
Hi everyone, I'm new to this forum and it seems like a great source of information! I'm purchasing a PVL flywheel with an ARC rod and 18lb valve springs and I would like to know what timing key to get with it. I have a Champion 196cc (Gx-200 clone) and I've taken the governor out so I want some safety. It's completely stock other than the governor delete, so what's the stock timing on these?
 

SAS289

Active Member
#2
If you run the stock timing key with the PVL you will get 28 degrees.

You should get nice power out of that. Years ago I read an article where they dyno'd the Champion 196 along with a 212 and GX200. The Champion 196 produced more HP than both the 212 and GX200 with identical mods done to the stock engines. I think it was something like 10.5 HP at 4600 RPM.
 
#3
Okay so I don't have to buy anything other than the flywheel and the rod and 18lb valve springs? The PVL flywheel's okay with the stock cam without any new timing keys?
 

SAS289

Active Member
#4
Okay so I don't have to buy anything other than the flywheel and the rod and 18lb valve springs? The PVL flywheel's okay with the stock cam without any new timing keys?
You may want to advance the timing. I can't give a good answer on how much extra timing you may need for what you are doing. But in the PVL document they recommend to start with a running timing between 28-31 degrees. With the correct flywheel puller you could easily make changes to the timing without beating on the crankshaft to remove the flywheel.
 
#5
You may want to advance the timing. I can't give a good answer on how much extra timing you may need for what you are doing. But in the PVL document they recommend to start with a running timing between 28-31 degrees. With the correct flywheel puller you could easily make changes to the timing without beating on the crankshaft to remove the flywheel.
So I've always assumed that the timing on the cam and the flywheel must be the same, am I correct with that?
 

SAS289

Active Member
#6
The "timing" marks on the cam and crankshaft remain the same. You simply make sure to line those up before you bolt on the side cover. It is the position of the flywheel on the crankshaft that makes the timing. The exact point that the flywheel fires the coil can be moved for different timing.
 
#7
The "timing" marks on the cam and crankshaft remain the same. You simply make sure to line those up before you bolt on the side cover. It is the position of the flywheel on the crankshaft that makes the timing. The exact point that the flywheel fires the coil can be moved for different timing.
Okay great! So I'm going to go ahead and buy the parts with no key.
 

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