Driven Spring Question

#1
Hello,

I see different colored driven springs listed, but they don’t have good descriptions like the driver springs have.
I am looking for a later overdrive, but still want it to get into overdrive.

Comet has yellow listed as a 30 series torsion spring, but also lists a gold compression spring?
Have seen green, yellow, black etc springs available but the driven on my Chinese TAV is red,
Not sure how that compares to any of the other colors?

I finally have the driver squared away, trying to figure out the driven and it seems there is a lot less info out there about the driven springs.

Can anyone put me in the right direction on this? Any help is greatly appreciated!
 
#3
Thank you for posting, but I am looking at that same piece of paper with all of the same info on it.
Notice how much info there is for the driver springs, but there’s not much info on the driven springs.
Can the gold spring be added to the yellow spring?
Is the yellow spring the only driven torsion spring that Comet makes?
OMB warehouse lists the yellow, in addition to green.

By searching I think I just found out that green is stock driven and yellow is stiffer driven. That’s a start.
Also it looks like the gold compression spring is used for bi-directional use. In other words the gold spring can be used on both inboard and outboard applications. So it doesn’t twist it just compresses. Cool idea

Notice the green stock spring is not even listed? So weird
 
#5
Thank you, I think i’ll order the yellow spring then.
Also does anyone have a good picture of which of the 3 holes is which?
I think once I get the driver figured out, this bike will be really fun to ride at all speeds.
 

GustoGuy

Active Member
#6
Thank you, I think i’ll order the yellow spring then.
Also does anyone have a good picture of which of the 3 holes is which?
I think once I get the driver figured out, this bike will be really fun to ride at all speeds.
The stiffer spring in the driven pulley will make the secondary shift faster to a lower gear (downshift) meaning the belt will travel to the top of the secondary much faster than if a softer spring was in there. The 3 holes allows for fine adjustment when using the original stock spring or aftermarket springs to change the downshift. Too stiff a spring will mean nearly instantaneous downshift when backing off the throttle which will make the bike more punchy feeling to ride whereas if a softer spring was in there it would not downshift as quickly and feel smoother on acceleration rather than always being in the lowest gear the second you back off the throttle. It would be interesting to see if you could get an aftermarket ramp or helix for these secondary like you can in snowmobiles.
 

Top