Florida Destruction

#1
I was just scrolling through Florida pics. And its typical media pics. Only the worst destruction when the house across the street is untouched.

If you are in Florida or anywhere else in the path, I hope the best for you. We lived in Charleston and experienced Hugo. Don't want to do that again.

But I did find 1 pic that I had to share. It's a sad pic of a Plymouth SuperBird on its lid in a yard. Looks like it was a very nicely restored car too.

Sadly I dont imagine it is the only classic/collector car to suffer this fate.

 
#4
I clicked to like this, But I really don't like seeing a beautiful classic destroyed... Even more, the families, and their homes/lives upended/detroyed are heartbreaking...... Prayers for them
It's like liking a YouTube video, you may not actually like the content but you appreciate it being posted. I "like" a lot of YouTube videos with content that angers and/or saddens me because I appreciate the information being made public.
 
#5
It's so sad seeing all the damage from down there in Florida makes me feel blessed to live where I am where we only have an occasional tornado. There's at least 12 people accounted for that died in this storm. Keeping them in my prayers. Also really hate to see that Plymouth Superbird get destroyed. I'm sure that collector is devastated.
 
#6
They live on the beach in florida. I dont feel bad for them one bit. They must know they are at risk they cant be that dumb can they? And had a week to get their stuff out of there. They must have a really good reason for leaving their stuff and themselves in harms way.
 
#7
It's so sad seeing all the damage from down there in Florida makes me feel blessed to live where I am where we only have an occasional tornado. There's at least 12 people accounted for that died in this storm. Keeping them in my prayers. Also really hate to see that Plymouth Superbird get destroyed. I'm sure that collector is devastated.
I used to live in Naples, looks like they got hit pretty hard. The hurricanes look and are terrible, but I bet in one winters time up north, there is more damage, loss of life etc, its just spread out and not as dramatic. anywhere you live mother nature can get ya in one way or another. We're pretty immune to that here in se ky, don't really get too much other then a flood here and there once every so often. A lot of times the media forecasts are what keep people planted in place and then the storm takes a different path and wham, they get nailed but you are all heart Jeep2003. smh
 

maverick1

Active Member
#9
I have lived in Florida all my life and 62 years of it on the Space Coast. First it is not just the water front homes that get destroyed. Homes far inland can suffer the same fate. I retired from the power company after 38 years and have seen and been in the middle of it all being storms or fires numerous times. After you talk to the people on their reason for riding it out you can sympathize with them for their reason to stay. Myself I grab my important papers and go because my attitude is that is why I have insurance. But I also know that I stand the chance of losing things that can never be replaced. The weather reporting is not the most reliable source and a lot of people were not under the mandatory evacuation. Until you have lived it many times you should not judge or throw stones.
 
#10
I clicked to like this, But I really don't like seeing a beautiful classic destroyed... Even more, the families, and their homes/lives upended/detroyed are heartbreaking...... Prayers for them
The irony of this car is that 30 years ago it would have been a total loss but in today's world every panel on that car is available and it is 100 percent fixable to as good or better than it was.

What has always been interesting about the pictures that make it to the news is what's actually in them. In the background of this picture is a relatively intact house/structure. Very little debris on the ground but right in the middle is 1 - a big heavy car and 2 - an intact toilet. Yet another picture looks like you set off a bomb in each structure. Pieces everywhere and most pieces aren't identifiable. @maverick1 is correct about the damage not being confined to any one spot. When Hugo hit Charleston every intersection on the interstate, almost to Columbia, with a cloverleaf looked like a tornado camped right in the middle of it. The trees and grass and debris were al spun in a big circle. Go 100 yards further down the interstate and it looked normal. I spent a lot of time on the barrier islands before and after Hugo. Some islands were flat from the ocean front to the intercoastal waterway. Yet the opposite end of the same island suffered minimal damage. The pine forest that belonged to Georgia Pacific were totally destroyed by Hugo. The problem wasn't fallen trees it was damage to the actual fiber structure of the wood. The wind blowing one direction ahead of the hurricane kept flexing them in one direction and then the eye passes, and the wind comes from the opposite direction. Most trees were still standing after the storm, but they wouldn't even cut them for pulp wood. They said there just wasn't anything usable. I talk to people that live in the upstate and have never lived on the coast about how the rising water seems to never stop coming during a hurricane and they can't seem to grasp it. You can't hide from it or outrun it.

Every Floridian I know or have chatted with about hurricanes has the same attitude as maverick1. It's not bravery of fear, it's a clear understanding of what is coming and how to deal with it. Most non-Floridians don't understand that.

And we have a member that hasn't been on in a while that is also in Florida, @Raskin. He lives north of Orlando near my friend John Craft and I feel sure he fared the same as John with wind and rain but no rising water.

It's a long road to recovery but they will get thru it and rebuild.
 
#11
And now the wing car story grows from the one car to 4 cars. If you look closely, you can see the nose of the upside down car in the edge of the shot of the car just sitting on the sand. The two in the pics were left on lifts while two were hauled away. It's a sad story no matter what the lost item is.

And according to the article he stayed in the house and rode out the storm. Wow!

Hurricane Ian Takes Out Two Mopar Wing Cars (msn.com)
 
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#14
I'll take our earthquakes here in California over stuff like that. It's been 33 years since we've had a quake really worth mentioning in this area.
 
#16
I'll take our earthquakes here in California over stuff like that. It's been 33 years since we've had a quake really worth mentioning in this area.
I lived in San Pedro in the 60s….we lost an Avocado tree an orange tree and our house to a quake in 68….we lived a few blocks from the beach on Averill avenue….moved to Xenia and went through the 1974 tornados there….much prefer earth quakes!
 
#17
My son has been working at our Clewiston Florida Copart yard for a month now on disaster relief. I've seen many of the cars going in there and it's heartbreaking(over 20,000 just at that yard). Having done disaster relief work for Copart myself, I can tell you first hand it's not only humbling, but it also makes you realize how fast things can go wrong and what decisions become necessary to survive. Now, I also agree there is a vast lack of common sense with some of these and also some of them seem deliberate.
 
#18
My son has been working at our Clewiston Florida Copart yard for a month now on disaster relief. I've seen many of the cars going in there and it's heartbreaking(over 20,000 just at that yard). Having done disaster relief work for Copart myself, I can tell you first hand it's not only humbling, but it also makes you realize how fast things can go wrong and what decisions become necessary to survive. Now, I also agree there is a vast lack of common sense with some of these and also some of them seem deliberate.

If common sense was so common how come so many don't have any?
 
#20
I lived in San Pedro in the 60s….we lost an Avocado tree an orange tree and our house to a quake in 68….we lived a few blocks from the beach on Averill avenue….moved to Xenia and went through the 1974 tornados there….much prefer earth quakes!
Wasn't the movie Gummo based in Xenia, OH?
 
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