Throttle lever & Breather kit ?

#1
I have 2 quick questions.

First, is my predator engine gonna be fine without the linkage lever? By fine I mean is it going to stop me from making future mods? I took my bike to a shop for help connecting the throttle and when I got it back the lever was no longer there but the throttle is responsive, although I haven't test driven the bike at all yet. I've never heard of this being necessary when setting up a throttle cable and I'm only concerned that I've been robbed of something vital to my engine.

My next question is how do I install the vent filters that came with my air filter kit from GoPowerSports? I have a Non-Hemi California Predator 212, most likely a newer model since I purchased it in 2019 (I was still able to re-jet my carburetor). My gas tank tube seems to be threaded through the tank on one side and my valve cover has a hole on the side of it instead of a port. I still have the stock air filter at hand as well as the tubes that popped off with it.

I attached a picture trying to get everything I've explained into it.
 

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#2
09,

I have to wonder if your governor is still functional with that configuration. It looks like the throttle cable will pull on the governor arm which in turn will push on the solid linkage opening the throttle. I suspect that the governor will not have enough torque to overcome the throttle twistgrip and the hand operating it. If what I am interpreting from your photo is correct then you have some problems. The most serious of which is a non-functional governor. Opinions vary regarding governor removal but the main concern is the safety of the rider and anyone else in the vicinity if the flywheel explodes from over-revving. Think cast steel shrapnel being jettisoned at high velocity. Assuming that the flywheel doesn't grenade, the next concern is the stock connecting rod failing due to operating the engine above the design RPM. Again, there are tons of different opinions regarding the stock connecting rod. The consensus on this forum is if you override the governor or delete it all together then a billet flywheel and billet connection rod are a must for both personal safety and longevity of the engine.

Now that I'm done scaring you let's see what the best solution is. If you paid someone to connect the throttle go back to them and express concerns that the governor no longer works. You can set up a twistgrip throttle on this engine and still have a functional governor. The lever that is missing on your engine will be needed. An additional throttle return spring will be helpful as the stock springs are pretty light. Here's a link to a thread on this forum discussing throttle setup that maintains governor function:

https://oldminibikes.com/forum/inde...ottle-return-spring-pics.157000/#post-1173424

Getting this setup properly is going to be your best bet. I will prevent you from having to buy expensive parts and opening the engine to install them. Or you could go the other route and install the billet rod and flywheel and use it as a learning experience. These engines are easy to work on with just hand tools. Before going this route do some research to figure out which tools you will need. Don't hesitate to ask questions on this forum. Everyone here likes to share information.

Post some pics of the aftermarket valve cover/fuel tank venting parts that came with your kit. I'd like to see what you have to work with.

These engines pack quite a value and can provide some impressive performance even in relatively stock form.

-Ray
 
#3
09,

I have to wonder if your governor is still functional with that configuration. It looks like the throttle cable will pull on the governor arm which in turn will push on the solid linkage opening the throttle. I suspect that the governor will not have enough torque to overcome the throttle twistgrip and the hand operating it. If what I am interpreting from your photo is correct then you have some problems. The most serious of which is a non-functional governor. Opinions vary regarding governor removal but the main concern is the safety of the rider and anyone else in the vicinity if the flywheel explodes from over-revving. Think cast steel shrapnel being jettisoned at high velocity. Assuming that the flywheel doesn't grenade, the next concern is the stock connecting rod failing due to operating the engine above the design RPM. Again, there are tons of different opinions regarding the stock connecting rod. The consensus on this forum is if you override the governor or delete it all together then a billet flywheel and billet connection rod are a must for both personal safety and longevity of the engine.

Now that I'm done scaring you let's see what the best solution is. If you paid someone to connect the throttle go back to them and express concerns that the governor no longer works. You can set up a twistgrip throttle on this engine and still have a functional governor. The lever that is missing on your engine will be needed. An additional throttle return spring will be helpful as the stock springs are pretty light. Here's a link to a thread on this forum discussing throttle setup that maintains governor function:

https://oldminibikes.com/forum/inde...ottle-return-spring-pics.157000/#post-1173424

Getting this setup properly is going to be your best bet. I will prevent you from having to buy expensive parts and opening the engine to install them. Or you could go the other route and install the billet rod and flywheel and use it as a learning experience. These engines are easy to work on with just hand tools. Before going this route do some research to figure out which tools you will need. Don't hesitate to ask questions on this forum. Everyone here likes to share information.

Post some pics of the aftermarket valve cover/fuel tank venting parts that came with your kit. I'd like to see what you have to work with.

These engines pack quite a value and can provide some impressive performance even in relatively stock form.

-Ray
Fhpe,

I actually ended up taking the bike for a run yesterday, before I seen your comment. I must be blessed because you definitely scared me up pretty good right now.
My bike is capping out at 36mph at full throttle (I touched 38mph but maybe that was a bad reading). As a YouTube student in all this, I believe that's about as far as the governor will allow you to take the engine, so it must still be functioning somehow? I took another picture of what's going on towards the front of my engine; theres a spring going through the same hole as the throttle cable, and that same spring is being held under a bolt above the power switch. I'm not sure what's going on there but is this typical?
As for the vent filters, I cut the gas tube smaller and zip tied the bigger of the 2 breathers onto it. Then I stuck some tube down that valve cover hole and tied the smaller breather to the end of that. I was skeptical doing that because I didn't want it to interrupt the valve springs in any way, but I went through with it and it didn't give me any issues.

Once I sort all this junk out and feel more comfortable about it, my next upgrade WILL be the flywheel and rod. As well as some loc-tite because my torque converter flew off on me yesterday. Once again, I must be blessed.

- My name is Ray as well, small world.
 

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#4
Ray,

It looks like they repurposed that spring to act as a throttle return spring. It certainly wasn't installed that way from the factory, clamped under the blower housing bolt. Your new pics really have me thinking that the governor is no longer functional. Topping out at 36 mph could be how the torque converter is tuned or so I have read. I've only played with centrifugal clutches so perhaps another forum member can chime in. I have read some accounts of torque converters limiting RPM due to the load they place on the engine. A tachometer will be needed to show your exact engine speed since your final drive ratio varies with the torque converter. Unlike a torque converter, a centrifugal clutch provides a fixed drive ratio. I use a GPS speed app on my phone to log the top speed then calculate the engine RPM using the gear ratio, tire diameter, and speed.

Your breather setup looks good. I suspect that the valve cover has a baffle or oil separator that will prevent you from pushing the tube in far enough to interfere with the rocker arms/valve springs. You could confirm this by removing the valve cover and inspecting it.

Installing a billet flywheel and connecting rod is a good decision. While you are in the engine to install the rod it is a good time to remove the oil level sensor and the internal portion of the governor. The internal portion of the governor is plastic with metal weights. I have read of these coming apart at higher RPMs and causing havoc inside the crankcase. Since you are already in the engine consider replacing the stock camshaft. There are plenty of great cams to choose from which result in a dramatic power increase. Most cam swaps require upgraded valve springs which are easy to swap out as well.

Jodi from Arc Racing has a great youtube channel that details most of these modifications including how to properly install a billet connecting rod and flywheel. He also shows exactly which tools will be needed for each job. Harbor Freight has a nice cheap inch-pound torque wrench that is perfect for torquing the rod bolts.

I suspect you are really going to enjoy building up this engine. I know I did. My wife however was not pleased with the 212 cc dining room table centerpiece that was there for a month or so during the build. :)

-Ray
 

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