Clutch chain

SAS289

Well-Known Member
#3
Trying to remove the chain. On my mb200 to swap out the clutch but the chain has no master link?
Any suggestions?
For that I would take the large castle nut off the jackshaft then slide the clutch and driven sprocket off at the same time. At one point you will need to move the tension roller out of the way.

All that looks brand new in the picture.
 

toomanytoys

Well-Known Member
#4
For that I would take the large castle nut off the jackshaft then slide the clutch and driven sprocket off at the same time. At one point you will need to move the tension roller out of the way.

All that looks brand new in the picture.
He said in another post the clutch locked up and it tries to turn the wheel when he pull starts it.
 
#5
For that I would take the large castle nut off the jackshaft then slide the clutch and driven sprocket off at the same time. At one point you will need to move the tension roller out of the way.

All that looks brand new in the picture.
Yeah we had this thing for maybe 45 mins and the clutch gave out. No mods other than backing out throttle screw.
 
#7
For that I would take the large castle nut off the jackshaft then slide the clutch and driven sprocket off at the same time. At one point you will need to move the tension roller out of the way.

All that looks brand new in the picture.
This worked out for me thank you!
 
#8
Are you sure that the master link (clip) was not installed on the back side? (I have seen that before)
Michael
Looked. There’s one on the rear tire chain. Y’all weren’t lie’n when it was mentioned that the quality control is the shits.

I almost took it back today. The further we got through exploring things once we took bits apart the more disappointed I was.

I looked through a lot to finally purchase an mb200- not once did I see anything about them being built so shitty. I figured they were little beasts after seeing so many videos of people thrashin them.
I guess I wasent searching on the right websites!

I knew I would end up putting money into it too but didn’t know I’d start potentially the first day
 

Lizardking

Well-Known Member
#9
Looked. There’s one on the rear tire chain. Y’all weren’t lie’n when it was mentioned that the quality control is the shits.

I almost took it back today. The further we got through exploring things once we took bits apart the more disappointed I was.

I looked through a lot to finally purchase an mb200- not once did I see anything about them being built so shitty. I figured they were little beasts after seeing so many videos of people thrashin them.
I guess I wasent searching on the right websites!

I knew I would end up putting money into it too but didn’t know I’d start potentially the first day
Did you oil the clutch before riding? Should be done before every long or hard ride even if it's new.

Edit: Just read your other post on this but still should be regular maintenance.
 
Last edited:
#10
Did you oil the clutch before riding? Should be done before every long or hard ride even if it's new.

Edit: Just read your other post on this but still should be regular maintenance.
Did not oil it, was just going off of the manual and it never mentioned it but when I took it apart it was bone dry.
I lightly greased everything on the rebuild of it this time and won’t make that mistake again. Is there an easier way to oil/grease it rather than taking it all apart and fighting to get it all back together?
 

Lizardking

Well-Known Member
#11
Taking it apart is the best way. Oiling the bushing every couple of hrs on a day run is fine.

If you don't take it on long rides then just keep that bushing oiled in between break down service.

Practice will make it easier to service.
 
#12
Did not oil it, was just going off of the manual and it never mentioned it but when I took it apart it was bone dry.
I lightly greased everything on the rebuild of it this time and won’t make that mistake again. Is there an easier way to oil/grease it rather than taking it all apart and fighting to get it all back together?
For the bushing I think I'm going to install a thick felt washed against the bushing and soak it in oil so hopefully the clutch bushing last longer. Have not done it yet because I haven't researched it enough to find the drawbacks like getting hot and burning. In theory it should help.
 

mustangfrank

Well-Known Member
#13
For the bushing I think I'm going to install a thick felt washed against the bushing and soak it in oil so hopefully the clutch bushing last longer. Have not done it yet because I haven't researched it enough to find the drawbacks like getting hot and burning. In theory it should help.
I see flinging the oil to places you don't want it on the clutch as a potential pitfall but don't let that stop you experimenting.

Personally I just hit my centrifugal clutches with a tiny shot of lube before a ride but I considered trying a Max-Lube fitting/clutch for a bike I plan on taking camping.

Max Torque - Max-Lube System Clutch (targetdistributing.net)
 

I74

Well-Known Member
#15
For the bushing I think I'm going to install a thick felt washed against the bushing and soak it in oil so hopefully the clutch bushing last longer. Have not done it yet because I haven't researched it enough to find the drawbacks like getting hot and burning. In theory it should help.
What I do on clutches is ,,

Where the end of the bushing protrudes on some clutches on the ''sprocket'' end,, I take & file a small notch on the end of the bushing ''inline'' with where one of the oil grooves run on the inside of the bushing.

I then use a small R/C motor ect. oil bottle with the metal needle extension tip,, & put in a ''few drops'' of oil ''in the notch'' before ''every run'', using ''personally'' Syn. 20-50.

Rolling the clutch back & forth 360* ''slowly'',, helps get the oil in there also.

It works great for me doing it this way, haven't had any troubles,, & you don't have to take the clutch drum off every time you want to oil the bushing. ;)

I
 
Last edited:
#18
I like to use anti-sieze lubricant on some clutches. It helps protect the part and can make it a lot eaiser to remove off the crankshaft if you ever need to take it apart.
 
#19
I like to use anti-sieze lubricant on some clutches. It helps protect the part and can make it a lot eaiser to remove off the crankshaft if you ever need to take it apart.
If the clutch in question has a sintered bronze bushing, “Oilite”, the bushing mfgr recommends SAE 30 oil. Our laco is not that, but is better than nothing. I have filled the Laco dispenser with 30 wt., and then promptly gave it to a friend.
Just what we have been doing.
 
Top