Ethanol Free Gas "Who Uses It "

#1
I've been using ethanol free gas for about a year now with great results... no starting problems. I guess I get tired of hearing people complain about there small engines not starting after they have set for a few months, it could be a Briggs, Tecumseh or a Clone engine. We have tore some clone carbs down that have set over the winter months with ethanol gas in them...and what a mess.
 
#2
I ran it at Windber. My Dad picked up 5 gallons for us. I have him getting me some more because I felt it was worth the extra 30cents/gallon.
 
#3
Winters are non-existent, so they're all started at least once per month. Anything I wont be running gets the fuel drained out of the bowl. (or tank if BS pulsa) The pump is not far, and reasonably priced, but I see no reason to run it in lawn mower engines, though several of my friends run it in their hotrods and vintage muscle cars.

I don't understand why anyone would leave fuel in a float bowl "for a few months." Drain it, and shoot a bunch of WD 40 in it. (WD means "water displacement") It'll keep things from corroding.
 
#4
I use 91 octane non oxy premium in my mini bikes, and all of my non-automobiles. All the machines really like it.

Aside from costing a little bit more, it can produce more carbon on low compression engines, but I think it's worth it.

A It's a trade-off. The primary benefit of premium non-oxygenated fuel in any engine not operated on a regular basis is the reduced potential for moisture contamination in the fuel and the resultant phase separation and corrosion issues. The disadvantage is the higher octane rating, which is not necessary in most small engines. Higher-octane fuels are "built" with longer hydrocarbon molecules that burn more slowly. In low-compression engines -- typical of most small engines -- the slower burn rate can lead to more carbon deposits from unburned fuel.
 
#5
LOL...the rest of the story:

Q I have a question about fuels. I understand the difference between premium gas with ethanol and premium gas without ethanol. I have been told that this is also called "racing fuel." Since non-ethanol premium fuel has become more readily available in recent years, I have used it in my small engines -- snow blowers, trimmers, lawn mowers, leaf blowers.

I recently heard that the premium non-ethanol gas can damage or shorten the life of small engines because of the high octane and higher burn temperatures. Is this true? I thought it would be a better fuel as it eliminates the alcohol. I know my truck runs better on it, as does my motorcycle. What is the best fuel for smaller engines?

A It's a trade-off. The primary benefit of premium non-oxygenated fuel in any engine not operated on a regular basis is the reduced potential for moisture contamination in the fuel and the resultant phase separation and corrosion issues. The disadvantage is the higher octane rating, which is not necessary in most small engines. Higher-octane fuels are "built" with longer hydrocarbon molecules that burn more slowly. In low-compression engines -- typical of most small engines -- the slower burn rate can lead to more carbon deposits from unburned fuel.

But as I said, it's a trade-off. I'm willing to de-carbonize my small engines periodically as the trade-off to reduce the potential for moisture and/or phase separation with oxygenated fuels that sit in the tank for any significant length of time.

Adding SeaFoam to the fuel can help prevent these problems, but in my opinion non-oxygenated fuels are a better choice for any engine operated on a seasonal or intermittent basis.
 
#7
i run non ethanol regular in all of my non high comp engines. runs best with lowest octane your engine will run, but if premium is the only way to get non ethanol id do it because ethanol really does do horrible things to small amounts of gas AKA your fuel bowl

in SHORT periods of time too...
 
#8
I ran it at Windber. My Dad picked up 5 gallons for us. I have him getting me some more because I felt it was worth the extra 30cents/gallon.
Me to Chad...I really believe its worth it in the long run ..yea its a little higher in price for sure,. but when you buy 5 gallons at a time It lasts for months.

Winters are non-existent, so they're all started at least once per month. Anything I wont be running gets the fuel drained out of the bowl. (or tank if BS pulsa) The pump is not far, and reasonably priced, but I see no reason to run it in lawn mower engines, though several of my friends run it in their hotrods and vintage muscle cars.

I don't understand why anyone would leave fuel in a float bowl "for a few months." Drain it, and shoot a bunch of WD 40 in it. (WD means "water displacement") It'll keep things from corroding.
Very good Info Dave...if you are going to run ethanol gas in your mini or kart..and let it set for months, drain it or just simply run it out of gas.

I use 91 octane non oxy premium in my mini bikes, and all of my non-automobiles. All the machines really like it.

Aside from costing a little bit more, it can produce more carbon on low compression engines, but I think it's worth it.

A It's a trade-off. The primary benefit of premium non-oxygenated fuel in any engine not operated on a regular basis is the reduced potential for moisture contamination in the fuel and the resultant phase separation and corrosion issues. The disadvantage is the higher octane rating, which is not necessary in most small engines. Higher-octane fuels are "built" with longer hydrocarbon molecules that burn more slowly. In low-compression engines -- typical of most small engines -- the slower burn rate can lead to more carbon deposits from unburned fuel.
Thanks Ding Ding...this is some very good Info !

i run non ethanol regular in all of my non high comp engines. runs best with lowest octane your engine will run, but if premium is the only way to get non ethanol id do it because ethanol really does do horrible things to small amounts of gas AKA your fuel bowl

in SHORT periods of time too...
Exactly JKautoFab...Thanks for posting.
 
#9
Maybe its just me but I havnt had ethenol mess up a carb in many years. When they first started pushing it I sure did but I think they may have put more additives in it or whatever to prevent it spoiling so quickly. It still messes up the rubber parts though
 
#10
Maybe its just me but I havnt had ethenol mess up a carb in many years. When they first started pushing it I sure did but I think they may have put more additives in it or whatever to prevent it spoiling so quickly. It still messes up the rubber parts though
Exactly. The corrosive effects we are seeing come from long term storage. Yes, it chews up fuel lines BAD.
 
#11
I finally gave up on ethanol gas in all my small engines. I first switched on my 2 strokes then decided to use it on everything else ( not cars) after the winter we had last year. I run my equipment dry that I wont be using over winter,add seafoam to bowls ect. but this spring I had rotted out rubber,totally corroded carbs ect. Now that I've made the switch my chainsaws start in 2 maybe 3 pulls same with everything else 2 stroke. My boat engines idle properly,everything likes non-ethanol 93 octane so much better. And really most my toys are old from the '70's and were meant for this type of fuel. It's pricey around here....but I really don't use 100 gal a yr. lol
 
#13
In my area, the easiest non-ethanol fuel to obtain is 110 octane. Will this harm a small engine?
The only negative aspect I see would be the excess carbon buildup, but that won't really "harm" anything just have to be conscious of it possibly building up which could affect performance.
 
#14
In my area, the easiest non-ethanol fuel to obtain is 110 octane. Will this harm a small engine?
No harm, but it may not run as well because it needs higher compression to fully ignite. There are charts somewhere that give an idea of mixing ratios, (race gas to regular unleaded) and the resulting octane.

My son had a gasoline can full of race gas, and I assumed it was my mini bike fuel. (same red cans) I put most of a tank of race gas in a Tecumseh, rode it all over, and didn't have a clue it was race gas until my kid thanked me for stealing his race gas.

Personally, I don't think it's worth the money and you may be better off with additives that reduce water/condensation from the alcohol, and of course appropriate winterization methods.
 
#16
I use 91 octane non oxy premium in my mini bikes, and all of my non-automobiles. All the machines really like it.

Aside from costing a little bit more, it can produce more carbon on low compression engines, but I think it's worth it.

A It's a trade-off. The primary benefit of premium non-oxygenated fuel in any engine not operated on a regular basis is the reduced potential for moisture contamination in the fuel and the resultant phase separation and corrosion issues. The disadvantage is the higher octane rating, which is not necessary in most small engines. Higher-octane fuels are "built" with longer hydrocarbon molecules that burn more slowly. In low-compression engines -- typical of most small engines -- the slower burn rate can lead to more carbon deposits from unburned fuel.
Same here. I fill up a 5 gallon in the spring middle of summer and fall to use in the mower, snowblower, toys around the yard, etc. It's really not that much more money when you are talking about 20 gallons a year and when it comes time to clean carbs there is way less oxidation. Anyone who's pulled apart a carb that is full of white or white/green junk knows what I am talking about.

Interesting comment about carbon / unburned fuel. My 3 hp honda sure seems to have a lot of carbon that comes out of the exhaust (leaves black soot allover the engine) and the spark plug fouls out about every 10 hours (though it seems to be clearing up now after some more extended use).
 
#17
I use the 93 octane pump gas in all my small engines lawn snow blowers mini's my motorcycles add some red stable year round and never had a problem with them sitting. But i do start them all up once a month in the winter
 
#18
They sure do. A little over $7 per gallon. As little as I use, the price doesn't concern me, but I have heard some people say that it may run hot in the motor.
 

Midyrman

Well-Known Member
#19
Cars guys with carbureted engines in their classics have been aware of the ethanol gas issue for years. I've been using non-ethanol gas for several years.
 
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